The Dublin Pub Crawl: 10 Historic Pubs for Food, Spirits, and Legends Photo by: William Murphy via Flickr

The Dublin Pub Crawl: 10 Historic Pubs for Food, Spirits, and Legends

For the Irish, pubs are more than a place to meet friends for a pint after work. Over the centuries, Dublin pubs have served as the setting for legendary shootouts, watering holes for luminaries like Oscar Wilde, and a hotbed for British spies during the War of Independence. In the best of times and the worst of times, this is where it all went down, the tumultuous history of the fighting Irish in all its Guinness and whiskey soaked glory. Follow in the footsteps of Irish legends and walk along cobblestoned streets that date back to the days of medieval kings and Viking warriors. With such a rich saga, there is a page out of history around every corner.

10. The Old Stand

For an authentic pub experience, The Old Stand on Exchequer Street at the St. Andrews Street junction does not disappoint with its preserved Victorian décor and rugby fans drinking pints and shouting at the television screens. The pub has been around for about 300 years and within its walls, some of the most important events of Irish history took place. For Michael Collins, it was the meeting place where he gathered intel on British Secret Service agents and informants during the War of Independence. Some came to take the edge off with a pint after a long day at work, but for the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB), it was a base camp for gathering information and plotting to take out high-ranking British officials. Today, the place is a lively spot for locals and tourists who enjoy the friendly atmosphere, traditional Irish food, and of course, the beer and whiskey.

Two cups of beer in a pub in New Zealand

9. The Porterhouse

On the edge of the popular Temple Bar District is The Porterhouse, another pub with its own legends. It’s a favorite spot for locals and tourists for its live music on the first floor, plus plenty of space for dancing, drinking, and catching up with friends with three additional floors. It was also a meeting place for the infamous Cairo Squad, a special force commissioned by the British government to wage a reign of terror on the streets of Dublin during the War of Independence in the early 20th century. The legendary showdown between Michael Collins and his special forces happened in this very pub, a massacre known as “Bloody Sunday”. Today, the pub is owned by The Porterhouse Brewery Company, Ireland’s largest independent brewery known for handcrafted small-batch beers and old-style Irish food.

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